For Martha Stewart, the Secret Is Routine

The New York Times recently posted the article below on Martha Stewart’s beauty and makeup regime. For a woman of 72, Martha looks pretty spectacular. Her secret surprised me. She uses a lot of oils and serums. I was stunned to find out that a lot of the products she uses are relatively affordable. Now the same routine doesn’t work for everyone, but as you age, piling on the hydration is key to preventing wrinkles and signs of aging. Go Martha!  

The Martha Stewart Beauty Regimen: Fitness, Skin Care and Diet

JAN. 8, 2014

Karsten Moran for The New York Times

It turns out that the Bedford, N.Y., bathroom cabinet of Martha Stewart, 72, is as well stocked as its gardening shed. The many products help prime Ms. Stewart for on-air appearances like her show, “Martha Stewart’s Cooking School,” which began airing its third season on PBS last week.

SKIN CARE

I get up a couple hours before I’m supposed to leave in the morning and I’ll put on a mask. I like the Yon-Ka Gommage 305 or the Susan Ciminelli Hydrating Gel Mask right now. Or I’ll use the collagen mask from Mario Badescu or the Chanel Correction Lift, a firming mask, which works great for me. I’ll do this about five days a week and I don’t repeat the same mask two days in a row. I’ve always done this — well, basically since I discovered masks. I have to wear makeup for photo shoots, television and appearances, so I have to make sure my face is extremely clean in the morning. Then I shower and I wash it all off.

I slather myself with serums. First, it’s a toning lotion. Right now it’s either the Yon-Ka Lotion or a more specific spray, like the rose spray from Mario Badescu. I spray my whole face and body and then its Susan Ciminelli Marine Lotion from head to toe. I use the same products on my body as I use on my face. I don’t think there’s really any difference between the two, so the more moisturizers and serums you use, the better off you are. Then I might use a vitamin B or SkinCeuticals C E Ferulic serum. I’ll also put on Clé de Peau or SkinCeuticals moisturizer. With all of these serums, I find I don’t have to put on an eye cream, although my facialist insists I put one on. Sometimes, I will and the Clé de Peau is good or Caudalie has one — it’s the fancy one from their high-end line — and it’s very good, too. At the end, before any makeup, I use SkinCeuticals Physical Fusion UV Defense. If I’m not going to use foundation, I’ll use the tinted version, or if I use foundation, it’ll be the white one. Otherwise, I do my best to stay out of the sun. That’s very important. I do a lot of outdoor activity like gardening and I try to cover up and do SPF. Actually, I just bought a new sun hat that goes over your riding helmet. It’s pretty ugly, but it works.

‘I slather myself with serums.’ But first, a toning spritz or two.

If I’m traveling that day, I’ll be sure to have my Yon-Ka Lotion with me, which is a spray. On a recent plane ride to L.A., I sprayed myself five times. It’s hydrating, so I don’t look like a prune after flying.

I never go to bed with makeup on. First, I steam my face with a hot washcloth and then I use the AmorePacific or Shu Uemura cleansing oils. Johnson’s baby oil works really well, too. I use those as cleansers and they’re also excellent makeup removers. I like oil because it keeps my skin very moist, and it works for me. I don’t get clogged pores.

MAKEUP

I was told years ago by my daughter, Alexis, that I shouldn’t leave the house without makeup on. You’ll pay for it if you don’t because somebody will be there with a camera snapping away and you’ll look awful or just plain. I put on a light foundation, usually the AmorePacific tube called the Moisture Bound Tinted Moisturizer or the Clé de Peau Refining Fluid Foundation. I really like the YSL Touche Éclat Radiant Touch stick, which is fairly new I think. Then it’s Bobbi Brown bronzer. For mascara, I use Clinique High Impact mascara or I just got a new one from Givenchy. It has three little balls almost — it’s very cute. I got it from a makeup artist at John Barrett, when she did my eyes for the ballet. It’s a little short mascara but it makes your eyelashes look elongated. Also, I’ve used Latisse and it’s really helped. People should try that. It really works. I use a gloss on my lips. I use Buxom — I like the Samantha color — or a little bit of a lip pencil. I stick with nude colors, and maybe at night I’ll wear red and it’ll really stand out.

Quench time: The sea, Vitamin C and New York spa line Susan Ciminelli.

FRAGRANCE

I’ve been wearing Fracas since I was 19. I’ll put fragrance on three times a day. I’m thankful every day that they haven’t altered their formula. Although, I did just discover a new one by Hermès called Jour d’Hermès. It’s lovely.

HAIR

I use different shampoos. For me it’s like with skin care: I try to use a variety. I have to wash my hair almost every day because I have to have it done for pictures and stuff. Frédéric Fekkai Ageless shampoo and conditioner and Shu Uemura, the green line, are my two favorites. For styling, I don’t like a lot of mousse. I do use Sally Hershberger’s Texture Blast, which is like a hair spray, but just at the roots. I have really good hair and I don’t like to plaster it.

Robert Piguet’s classic Fracas and Yon-Ka lotion are some staples.

Parvin at John Barrett has been my colorist forever. She’s the blond expert. I think she’s the busiest colorist in New York. I like her because she does it in an hour so you don’t have to spend all day sitting there.

For cuts, I’m not fussy. I’ve been to Kevin at Frédéric Fekkai in the Mark. I’ve gotten my hair cut twice at Sally Hershberger recently, and they’re fabulous, too. There are so many fantastic haircutters in the city. Everybody’s hair looks much better than it used to.

Otherwise, Daisy Schwartzberg does my daily makeup and styling. Kevin from Fekkai will do styling for photo shoots, and Katsu from John Barrett does my blowout. They’re all good.

SERVICES

I’ve been going to Mario Badescu for 45 years for facials. I try to go at least once a month. For brows, Julia Haaland at John Barrett does them when I get my hair done. Luda, also at John Barrett — where else in New York can you get everything done at once? — does my nails almost exclusively. And she’s the best massager in the world. I stand, walk and hike and I still have good feet, and I thank her for that.

FITNESS AND DIET

Exercise is a necessary part of the day. I went to the gym this morning. I have a really great trainer in the city. We’ve worked together for at least eight years. Or I do yoga with James Murphy. I like to spin, but I don’t have enough time to do it. I also have a green juice that I drink every single morning. It’s very important. You can be the most beautiful person on earth, and if you don’t have a fitness or diet routine, you won’t be beautiful.

For The Love of Martha: Whiskey and Bourbon Cocktails

The following images and text are courtesy of Martha Stewart and the article can be found in full here. Sour Cherry Old-Fashioned

Sour Cherry Old-Fashioned

Get whisked away by a refreshing cocktail made with whiskey or bourbon. The alcohol works in summery cocktails such as the classic mint julep, or in more autumnal fare such as the maple bourbon cocktail.

The punch of sour cherries counters the rich oak flavor from the whiskey.

Ingredients

  • 24 frozen sour cherries
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 3/4 cup whiskey
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons kirsch
  • Thin lemon-zest strips (from 1 lemon)

Directions

  1. Place cherries in a heatproof bowl. Stir water and sugar in small saucepan to dissolve sugar. Bring to a boil, and pour over cherries. Let cool completely. Cover and refrigerate overnight.
  2. Drain cherries, reserving syrup. Thread 4 cherries onto each of 6 skewers. Make 3 drinks at a time: Pour 6 tablespoons whiskey, 3 tablespoons kirsch, and 4 1/2 teaspoons reserved syrup in a cocktail shaker 3/4 filled with ice. Shake and pour into chilled glasses. Garnish each with a skewer and 2 to 3 strips lemon zest. Repeat for the second batch.

Mint Julep

One of the oldest American cocktails, the mint julep originated in Virginia and was popularized in Kentucky. It is the signature cocktail of the American South.

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon water
  • 8 fresh mint leaves, plus sprigs for garnish
  • 1 cup crushed ice
  • 2 2/3 ounces (1/3 cup) bourbon

Directions

  1. Stir together sugar and water in a mint julep cup (or 8-ounce glass) until sugar dissolves. Add mint, and muddle gently using a muddler or a wooden spoon. Fill with crushed ice, and add bourbon. Stir until outside of cup is frosted. Garnish with mint sprigs.

 

Whiskey Sours

A classic mixed drink finished off with a buoy-like cherry floating on top.

Ingredients

  • 4 cups orange juice (from 8 oranges)
  • 1 cup fresh lemon juice (from 8 lemons)
  • 1 cup triple sec
  • 2 1/2 cups whiskey
  • Ice (for serving)
  • Orange slices (for serving)
  • Maraschino cherry (for serving)

Directions

  1. In a pitcher, combine orange juice, lemon juice, triple sec, and whiskey. Serve over ice, topped with an orange slice and a maraschino cherry, if desired.

Sazerac

A New Orleans original, this drink is best when made with rye whiskey, but top-shelf bourbon works too.

Ingredients

  • Ice
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons water
  • 4 ounces rye whiskey
  • 8 dashes bitters (preferably Peychaud’s)
  • 2 teaspoons anise-flavored liqueur, such as Herbsaint or Pernod
  • Lemon twists

Directions

  1. Fill two rocks glasses with ice to chill. In a third glass or cocktail shaker, stir together sugar and water until sugar dissolves. Add rye whiskey, bitters, and ice. Stir until chilled.
  2. Discard ice from glasses and add 1 teaspoon anise-flavored liqueur to each. Swirl to coat bottom and sides of glasses with liqueur, then pour off extra. Strain rye mixture into glasses and garnish with lemon twists.

The Presbyterian

Making this traditional cocktail is simple; it’s equal parts whiskey or bourbon, club soda, and ginger ale.

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces whiskey or Bourbon
  • 2 ounces club soda
  • 2 ounces ginger ale
  • 2 dashes Angostura bitters

Directions

  1. Fill a highball glass with ice. Add whiskey, club soda, ginger ale, and bitters. Stir and serve.

Whiskey Lemonade

This cocktail is practically begging to be sipped while sitting on a sunny porch swing.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons whiskey
  • 2 tablespoons Simple Syrup
  • Ice
  • Lemon zest

Directions

  1. In a glass, combine lemon juice, whiskey, and simple syrup over ice. Garnish with lemon zest. Add a splash of water if desired.

The Big Apple

Fall flavors from a lady apple and sparkling apple cider make this drink great for transitioning seasons.

Ingredients

  • 1 lady apple, cut in half lengthwise, or 2 slices of a larger apple
  • 3 ounces whiskey
  • 1 ounce dry vermouth
  • 2 dashes bitters
  • 1 cup sparkling apple cider

Directions

  1. Fill a large cocktail shaker halfway with ice. Add apple cider, whiskey, vermouth, and bitters. Shake. Strain into two glasses. Garnish each with an apple half or slice.

Bourbon and Ginger

A spritz of fresh lime juice gives a citrusy finish to this effervescent cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 4 ounces bourbon
  • 4 glasses filled with ice
  • 1 can (12 ounces) ginger ale
  • 4 lime wedges

Directions

  1. Divide bourbon among 4 glasses filled with ice. Divide ginger ale among glasses and squeeze 1 lime wedge into each. Serve immediately.

Sparkling Red-Wine Cocktails

Pair bourbon or another American whiskey with sparkling red wine and serve in a cinnamon sugar-rimmed glass.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 5 1/2 cups Lambrusco or other sparkling red wine
  • 24 ounces sparkling orange beverage, such as Orangina
  • 4 ounces Bourbon or other American whiskey
  • Orange wedge and slices
  • Ice

Directions

  1. Mix together sugar and cinnamon and spread on a small plate. In a large pitcher, combine red wine, orange beverage, and Bourbon. Rub an orange wedge around rims of eight rocks glasses, then dip glasses in cinnamon-sugar mixture to coat. Fill with ice, add cocktail mixture, and serve with orange slices.

Manhattan

This classic cocktail can be served in a martini glass for a sophisticated touch.

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 ounces bourbon or rye
  • 1/2 ounce sweet vermouth
  • 2 dashes Angostura bitters
  • Ice cubes
  • Maraschino cherry, for garnish

Directions

  1. Shake bourbon, vermouth, and bitters over ice. Strain into a cocktail glass; garnish with cherry.
  2. Shake bourbon, vermouth, and bitters over ice. Strain into a cocktail glass; garnish with cherry.

Amaretto-Bourbon Punch

Balance out a robust bourbon with sweet additions such as amaretto and sparkling apple juice.

Ingredients

  • 5 cups seltzer
  • 4 cups bourbon
  • 2 cups fresh lemon juice (from about 16 lemons)
  • 2 cups sparkling apple juice
  • 1 cup Simple Syrup
  • 3/4 cup amaretto or other almond-flavored liqueur
  • Ice cubes
  • Garnish: lemon slices and Maraschino cherries

Directions

  1. Combine seltzer, bourbon, juices, simple syrup, and amaretto in a punch bowl. Fill with ice. Garnish with lemon slices and cherries.

Maple-Bourbon Cider

This autumnal drink gets its sweetness from maple syrup, but a kick of cayenne keeps things interesting.

Ingredients

  • Ice
  • 6 ounces Bourbon
  • 4 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons pure maple syrup
  • 1 cup apple cider
  • Cayenne pepper

Directions

  1. Fill four glasses and a cocktail shaker with ice. To shaker, add bourbon, lemon juice, maple syrup, and apple cider; shake vigorously. Strain into glasses and top each with a pinch of cayenne pepper, if desired.

Citrus Arnold Palmer with Bourbon

English breakfast tea and bourbon complemented by citrus make this drink as unique as it is delicious.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups boiling water
  • 4 teaspoons loose English breakfast tea (or 4 tea bags)
  • 1/2 cup bourbon
  • Juice of 1 orange
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 2 tablespoons Simple Syrup Simple Syrup
  • Ice, for serving
  • Orange slices, for garnish

Directions

  1. Pour water over tea, and steep 5 to 7 minutes. Strain, and refrigerate. Stir in bourbon, juices, and syrup. Serve over ice with garnish.

Cherry-Orange Bourbon

Ingredients

  • 2 cups fresh or frozen sour cherries
  • 1 strip orange zest
  • 500 ml Bourbon

Directions

  1. Combine ingredients in a clean one-liter jar with a lid. Store in the refrigerator and shake daily for 4 days until infused, then strain and discard solids.

Peach and Blackberry Muddle

Fresh fruit is complemented by mint in this bourbon-based cocktail.

Ingredients

  • 4 thin slices peach
  • 6 blackberries
  • 2 large sprigs mint
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons honey
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 2 ounces bourbon
  • Ice
  • Seltzer

Directions

  1. In a double old-fashioned glass, combine 2 peach slices, 3 blackberries, mint, honey, and lemon juice. Mash gently with the back of a spoon until fruit releases juices. Add bourbon, remaining peach slices, and remaining blackberries. Fill glass with ice and top with seltzer.

Blackberry-Mint Julep

This slushy concoction has a deep purple color thanks to the blackberries.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup packed fresh mint leaves
  • 1 pint blackberries
  • 6 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/2 cup bourbon
  • 4 cups small ice cubes
  • 4 sprigs mint, for garnishing

Directions

  1. Roughly chop mint leaves.
  2. Puree the mint, blackberries, and sugar in a blender. Press through a fine sieve into a bowl; discard seeds.
  3. Rinse blender, then return puree to blender, and add bourbon and small ice cubes; blend until smooth. Divide mixture among 4 glasses. Garnish each with a mint sprig.

Irish Buck

This lime-laden drink doesn’t have to be enjoyed just on Saint Patrick’s Day.

Ingredients

  • Ice
  • 2 ounces Irish whiskey
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
  • 3 ounces ginger ale
  • Lime wedge

Directions

  1. Fill a glass with ice. Add whiskey, lime juice, and ginger ale. Stir and garnish with lime wedge.

Peach Juleps

A twist on the classic, these juleps are just peachy.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup fresh mint leaves, plus sprigs for garnish
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups store-bought peach juice
  • 1 can (12 ounces) club soda
  • 1/2 cup bourbon
  • Crushed ice, for serving

Directions

  1. In a medium bowl or pitcher, combine mint and sugar. With a wooden spoon, mash leaves until bruised. Stir in peach juice, club soda, and bourbon.
  2. Serve over crushed ice; garnish with more mint.

Cranberry Old-Fashioned, Cider Smash, and American in Paris

This drink marries bourbon with the tart flavor of cranberry. It’s strong, so you may want to add an extra tablespoon or two of water when muddling.

Ingredients

  • 8 fresh or frozen cranberries
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 2 dashes of Angostura bitters
  • 1 strip (2 inches) orange zest
  • 2 ounces bourbon

Directions

  1. Muddle cranberries, sugar, bitters, and orange zest with water in a medium glass until sugar dissolves. Pour in bourbon. Add ice cubes.

For The Love of Martha: Pet-Silhouette Tote

Every once in a while I browse Martha Stewart’s website to see what kind of crazy craft projects she comes up with. Some of them are wonderful ideas! As a homemade gift to an animal lover, Martha provides the following step-by-step instructions for making a Pet-Silhouette Tote Bag. The following images and text are courtesy of Martha Stewart Living.

Tools and Materials

  • Photograph of dog’s profile
  • Ultrasuede fabric
  • Fabric pen
  • Fabric scissors
  • Craft glue
  • Natural-canvas tote bag (ecobags.com)
  • Twill tape

Step 1:

Photocopy picture, enlarging so that dog is about two-thirds the height of the bag; cut out along dog’s outline.

Step 2:
Lay photo cutout, face up, on front of fabric, and trace with fabric pen. Cut out. Flip fabric silhouette.
Step 3:
Cut out. Flip fabric silhouette. Apply glue to dog’s head. Position silhouette, glue side down, on bag; press to adhere. Apply glue to the rest of the back of the silhouette in sections, pressing and smoothing out as you work
Step 4:
Cut a length of twill tape slightly longer than needed to form a collar and leash. Apply glue to 1 side of twill tape in sections; position tape on dog, starting with the back of the dog’s neck and curving the tape to mimic a collar. At front of dog’s neck, tuck tape slightly under the fabric. This will make it easier to pivot the tape upward for the leash. Continue gluing and positioning tape for leash. Let dry.

I can think of one adorable teacup black poodle names Lyla that would made an adorable silhouette.