Homemade Gnocchi

The following text and photos are courtesy of Etsy and the article can be seen in full here.

Eatsy: How to Make Homemade Gnocchi

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Photo by Adrianna Adarme

Story by Adrianna Adarme

Published on May 14, 2013 in Eatsy

As a person who adores comforting and cozy food, gnocchi is high on my list. It makes for a delicious meal that’s hearty, filling and super inexpensive.

Gnocchi is far from difficult to make, but it is very touch and feel. Knead it too little and it won’t hold together; knead it too much, and you’ll end up with very gummy gnocchi. If you’ve never conquered gnocchi-making, seeing a step-by-step how-to might bring you and a delicious bowl of pillowy gnocchi a little closer.

Here’s what you’ll need:

2 pounds (about 2-3) Russet potatoes
1/2 teaspoon fine-grain sea salt
1/2 to 3/4 cup all-purpose flour, plus more if needed

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Gnocchi begins by roasting starchy potatoes. In this instance, I used good ol’ Russet potatoes. They take about an hour to cook all the way through; a little slice in the top releases some of their steam so you can handle them.

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I used to make mashed potatoes by mashing them with one of those hand mashers, but ever since I started using a potato ricer, I’ll never, ever go back. A potato ricer is a dreamy kitchen tool.

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All of the potato gets scooped out and put through the ricer. It’ll come out in pretty little strings that are so very fluffy.

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Half of the flour is added to your kitchen counter or cutting board and the riced potato is poured out.

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The next step is kneading the potato and flour together. This is when it’s very much by touch. If it’s not kneaded enough, the dough won’t stick together; if it’s kneaded too much, the potato will turn into a gummy mess. I go little by little until everything starts to come together.

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After it’s kneaded a few times, the rest of the flour is added.

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A bit more kneading…

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And then the test! A small piece of gnocchi is rolled out, cut and dropped into a pot of simmering hot water.

If the gnocchi falls apart, it wasn’t kneaded enough, which is totally fine because you have the rest of the dough to correct. You know the gnocchi is perfectly kneaded when it rises to the top of the pot after a minute or so and comes out only slightly ragged around the edges. A little bit of raggedness is fine.

Then the rolling and cutting of the rest of the dough happens.

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Roll…

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…repeat…

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And cut.

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After the gnocchi is cut, you could make it right away, or you could freeze it for later. If you’d like to freeze it, transfer it to a floured, parchment-lined baking sheet and place it in the oven for 20 minutes, until the gnocchi is firm. Transfer the gnocchi to a freezer-safe plastic bag and boil when you’re ready!

Gnocchi
Serves 6

2 pounds (about 2-3) Russet potatoes
1/2 teaspoon fine-grain sea salt
1/2 to 3/4 cup all-purpose flour, plus more if needed

1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Place the potatoes on a baking sheet and bake until they’re tender when poked with a fork. This should take about one hour. When the potatoes are done, immediately slice them open to let the steam out.

2. Bring a large pot of water to a boil; add a few pinches of salt. Scoop out the potato flesh and transfer it to a potato ricer or food mill. Push the potato ricer down and repeat until you’ve passed all of the potato through the ricer. Sprinkle the potatoes with the salt and adjust according to your liking.

3. Sprinkle 1/4 cup of flour onto your clean counter or cutting board. Knead the potatoes with it, sprinkling in the remaining 1/4 cup flour, until the dough just comes together. If it’s still pretty shaggy, add more flour one tablespoon at a time.

4. Now for the test! Pinch off a piece of dough and roll out into a tube. Cut it into a few pieces and boil it to make sure it holds its shape. If it falls apart in the water, this means you’ll knead the dough a bit more. When right, the gnocchi will float to the top and look a little ragged but hold together when ready.|

5. Roll the rest of the dough into ropes that are about 1/2-inch thick, then cut the ropes into 1/2-inch lengths. Transfer the gnocchi to a parchment-lined baking sheet, being sure the gnocchi don’t touch each other.

6. Add the gnocchi to a boiling water a few at a time. Adjust the heat so the mixture doesn’t boil too vigorously–it should be more like an aggressive simmer. When the gnocchi rise to the surface of the water, they’re done. Remove them with a slotted spoon or mesh strainer and transfer them to your sauce or to a paper towel.

All photos by Adrianna Adarme. 

Adrianna Adarme is a recipe blogger and content producer living in Los Angeles. She writes the blog A Cozy Kitchen, where she shares comforting, easy, everyday recipes from her kitchen.

Tangierino, Mamma Maria and Improv Asylum

Valentine’s Day was comprised of my boyfriend doing his National Guard duty up in Massachusetts, clearing roads and debris after the blizzard, and me, stuck in a cramped conference room for 14 hours working on yet another audit. To make up for missing the opportunity to be romantic, I drove up to Boston for the weekend to spend some time with my man.

This was our third Valentine’s “together.” To give you a brief history… Our first Valentine’s Day I was still in school and living in the Bronx and he came to visit. I had class for most of the day, but anticipated returning to my apartment to find my boyfriend looking clean and sharp with a bouquet of flowers and ready for a dinner date. Instead he was in boxers, hanging out on the couch with nothing planned. Epic fail. I ended up booking us a dinner reservation at the Capital Grille and we made the best of it. Valentine’s Day #2 was spent home alone while my boyfriend served his country in Afghanistan. It was a tough day to be alone and I missed him terrilbly, but from afar we managed an ,”I love you” and carried on.

This time around my expectations were minimal. I imagined a repeat of V-Day 1. I sent a reminder text to let him know that I wanted flowers and that I was looking forward to seeing him. I figured it would be a normal weekend, nothing too spectacular. Though I did not receive any flowers, the Army Ranger had something even better up his sleeve.

Making up for two lost Valentine’s, he planned an extravagant weekend in Boston with wonderful food, drink and cheer.

Tangierino

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We began our date night at this beautifully decorated hookah and tapas lounge located in Charlestown. It was perfect. I imagine everyone in the restaurant was gagging as we spent the entire time sitting pressed against each other, laughing, sharing drinks and food and the occasional kiss.

We ordered the Merguez (Tangierino spiced ground lamb wrapped in phyllo dough, smoked eggplant, kalamata olives). Heavenly. I adore lamb, it is one of my favorite meats and this was perfectly seasoned.

The other highlight of this restaurant is the Moroccan Mojito made with Blackberry Bacardi, Moroccan mint tea, muddled lime and mint. Heavenly. This was hands down the best spin on a mojito I have ever had.

Mamma Maria

Probably the best restaurant in the North End, Mamma Maria is the only Italian restaurant in Boston to earn the Four Diamond Rating by AAA Travel Guide. It it well worth it.

This was a night for a new experience. I tried the Rabbit Pasta (classic slow-cooked Vermont-raised rabbit, in the Tuscan-style, with homemade pappardelle, crispy pancetta, and fresh rosemary). It was outstanding! The flavor was incredible! The meat was tender and succulent without tasting like strong game. Probably one of the best meals I have ever had.

The place is perfect for dates. Comfortable tables, excellent service and very romantic. I loved it!

Improv Asylum 

After dinner we headed to a midnight show at the Improv Asylum. This was my second time at the asylum and it was as hilarious as the first. The show is run by posing questions to the audience and running wild with the themes and ideas provided. The cast is hilarious and do a wonderful job on taking commonplace topics and giving them a unique and ridiculous twist. I highly recommend this place.

My man surpassed expectations. He planned a wonderful evening for us, full of good food, drink and romance. I had a truly fantastic time.

Rosetta Stone – Italian

I know I mentioned on my Bucket List the intention of learning Italian while residing in some beautiful Italian city surrounded by handsome men, stunning architecture and delectable pastries. However, with a vacation to Italy coming up mid-July, I am inspired to start practicing my language skills a bit earlier than anticipated.

While in Kabul, Kyle picked up a variety of Rosetta Stone languages levels 1-5 for $80 a piece. This bunch included Italian, French and Arabic for myself. With Italy in July and academic finals complete, I start learning tonight! The pressure is on. The goal is conversation in Italian by my trip July 18th. Wish me luck!!