Spa Services for Men

Thank you, Time Out New York, for yet another inspiring article. All of you ladies out there searching for a Valentine’s Day treat for your man, look no further. TONY has suggested a few super masculine spas to satisfy all many needs. 

Following text and pictures courtesy of Time Out New York. See article in full here.

New York Spas For Men: Four spots that focus on guys

Most New York spas are guy-friendly, but certain places specialize in services for the male persuasion. Here are four of the best spas for men around town.

By Time Out editors

Guys sometimes get slighted at New York’s pampering spots. But there are a few barbershops, salons and spas that devote a solid chunk of their menu (if not all of it) to massages, facial andoffbeat treatments designed for just men. Four of our male editors test out some spas for men.

Kiehl’s Spa 1851: Close Shavers Squadron Service

The barber area of the steampunkish space is clearly for the boys, with its pair of black-leather-and-chrome chairs and Sailor Jerry aesthetic. My master barber, Justin Virgil, slathered my face with Close Shavers Shaving Formula 31–O preshave oil, followed by White Eagle shave cream and, finally, hot foam. A steamy eucalyptus-scented towel was applied between each potion for maximum whisker softening. Once the straight-razor shave itself started, Justin meticulously dispatched my 5 o’clock shadow. A postshave toner followed by a soothing mask and Facial Fuel moisturizer wrapped up the experience, and I walked away with none of the blotches or bloody spots typical of my own handiwork. Most products used in the service are available in the shop, so you can easily upgrade your at-home routine. 888-772-1851,kiehls.com/spa1851. $55.—Ethan LaCroix

157 E 64th St, second floor, (between Lexington and Third Aves)

The Spa at the OUT NYC: Customized facial

It’s easy to forget that you’re just a few blocks from Times Square when lounging in the glass-covered atrium of the spa at the OUT NYC, a gay-oriented (but “straight-friendly”) hotel. I opted for a facial, and felt completely comfortable as manager Christopher Drummond guided me through its many stages: a wash of OSEA Ocean cleanser, a gentle microdermabrasion scrub, an oxygen serum, an aloe mask and an antiaging balm (with brief intermissions of warm towels). Bonus: Booking any service gives you free access to the spa’s facilities, including the gym and deck. 646-527-7940, theoutnycspa.com. 60mins regularly $140, 90mins regularly $185. Mention TONY when booking or at check-in for 15 percent off this service through Jan 31.—Adam Feldman

510 W 42nd St, (between Tenth and Eleventh Aves)

Truman’s Gentlemen’s Groomers: The Professional package

The reception area of this guy-oriented salon—with its flatscreen TVs tuned to football games and open bar stocked with Sixpoint lager and Scotch—says it all: This is a man’s world. After I helped myself to a drink, my hairstylist, Miriam Vargas, conducted a thorough assessment of my preferences, dispelling the quiet desperation that accompanies most of my haircuts. Next, I was seated at a sink, my head shampooed with Redken Color Extend, then kneaded. The staff escorted me to one of several red leather barber chairs and Vargas set to nipping and cutting with scissors. My shoes were soon removed to be shined, and a manicurist scooted up to my side to clean, sand, moisturize and rub my digits into hand-model-worthy appearance. While savoring the novel sensation of having one’s hair and nails cut simultaneously, I eavesdropped on my fellow customers, who traded tales about high-end Mexican hotels. After a rinse, Vargas applied Mop Orange Peel molding cream to my hair before sending me off to a dinner date, feeling like a spiffier, shinier man.212-683-9400, trumans-nyc.com. $88.—Christopher Ross

121 Madison Ave between 30th and 31st Sts

John Allan’s: Sports pedicure

With a muted color scheme of browns and grays, the midtown location of this men’s club mirrors the professional, mostly middle-aged clientele I joined on a Tuesday morning. To start, I was offered coffee, iced tea or a beer (Sam Adams or Coors Light), then led to a private room off the main open-plan floor. The treatment itself began with each nail being cut, filed and buffed efore the manicurist used a succession of scrapers and pliers to clean the cuticles and remove the gunk from under the nail. Then came a sanding—vigorous and firm—of the heels, toes and balls of my feet. At this point, I expected comments on the amount of sloughed skin gathering on my technician’s lap, but I was mercifully spared a lecture. The service ended with the application of a CND Spapedicure scrub and mask, a hot towel wrap and a quick massage. The difference between my pre- and post-treatment feet was incredible—I’ll be back so that I don’t need to hide my trotters under a towel the next time I’m poolside. Visit johnallans.com. 45–60min; $49.—Jonathan Shannon

Locations throughout the city

Christmas Shopping Frustrations

Silver bells, mistletoe, spiked egg nog, the crisp scent of fresh pine, the chance to see the entire extended family together (arguing or not, it is a beautiful thing)… Those are a few highlights, but December is one of those months where everything is shadowed by an overarching theme of false holiday cheer, tacky and obnoxious tunes, gaudy lights, annoying shoppers, and crazy sales.

I have a firm anti-Christmas and anti-Birthday gift policy among my friends. We do not exchange gifts during these times. Birthday’s are for parties and fun events. Therefore any money that would go to a gift goes to making that event snazzier and more elaborate. This may include, but is not limited to purchasing a ridiculous sequin dress, buying enough alcohol to kill a herd of elephants, or splurging at a chichi restaurant with cloth tablecloths and silver knives.

In regards to the holiday season, we all buy gifts for family members, splurging on Kindle’s, cameras and fancy watches to appease their good taste. This leaves little in the budget left for close friends. Credit cards end up maxed out with gifts, travel expenses and food. Therefore, we usually agree to not exchange gifts in order to make our hectic lives a little bit simpler during this time of year.

The main reason for my aversion to the holiday shopping: obligation ruins a gift. Around the holidays people buy gifts for each other to show their love, respect and appreciation for them. This is a lovely sentimental aspect that has been perverted by commercial holiday nonsense and varying senses of obligation. By obligation, I refer to the feeling someone has when they know that another individual has purchased a gift for them and therefore they feel as though they have to purchase one in return to make the gift transaction fair. This is a ludicrous notion. As well as someone receiving a gift and having not provided one in return, feeling a sense of guilt. It also occurs when someone gives a gift without receiving one in return and gets peeved at the lack of courtesy.

I lavish in the random, the unwarranted, and the surprise. A trip to an exotic island or a new country is a great opportunity to pick up a little trinket, clothing or cultural item for a friend or family member. Checking out a fall festival or summer arts fair is another great time to grab some handmade art that reminds you of a certain someone. It is these moments where you truly, in the moment, are reminded of that person. The chosen gift is personal and invokes their individuality without being rushed, forced or wrapped in tacky reindeer paper. These types of gifts are unique, appreciated more, and there is no sense of obligation involved.

Another note on the holiday season, Christmas cards are a waste of money, trees and end up thrown out in under a week. Unless a baby picture is tucked in that little envelope with the card, pick up the phone and speak to your family and friends. Wish them a warm holiday and lots of cheer. I have received cards from people I have not spoken to in months. In these cases, I would prefer a phone call and a chance to catch up. In regards to people I see everyday, just wish me a happy holiday over coffee. Or, plan a big group dinner sometime before the holiday. Do something together or at least be personable over the phone.

I swear I am not a Grinch. Happy Holidays!